how to get more conversions

Get More Engagement on Social Media Now...Here's How (With Conversion Screenshots for Proof).

Relationships...we have them.

Some are strained, only holding on by a thread. Others are seemingly effortless, and richly abundant. Some of us chronically run from them when they get tough. On the other hand, some of us overstay our welcome in them.

Relationships are complicated and intricate. So is our content.

The content we create tends to be shaped by our relationship with the platform on which we’re creating it. If we’re really invested in our Facebook connections, our focus and energy will go toward creating A-game content for Facebook. If Twitter is where you feel most alive, your Twitter content will reflect that level of love.  If you don’t feel that great about blogging, then your blog will be cold, dusty and barren with neglect. Yes, your ‘just not that into’ it vibe will be apparent.

Great content is only as relevant as the platform on which it’s delivered. Therefore, it stands to reason that in order to get great content, we must first determine the platform that will deliver it. This will directly affect how the content is structured and presented.

Really good engagement is sharing a big plate of nachos with your best friends but online. 

You want that ‘big plate of nachos’ engagement that only comes from the synergy of aligning your target audience of a specific platform with the caliber of content that fulfills their needs. Put the plate in the middle of the table and let everyone dig in. This is how you should be thinking about your social media posts. 

“Is what I’m posting a big plate of nachos that everyone on this platform will want to dig into?”

If your engagement is low, the answer is ‘No’.

There are nearly 2.1 billion people on social media. Nearly 7 in 10 users are actively using their accounts. Yet your content is only getting comments from spam accounts or your 1-2 loyal audience members.

What is causing the choke? Why are you getting none of that engagement on your account?

How to Boost Your Engagement on Social Media

Today’s blog discusses how to boost your engagement on social media by understanding how your audience is engaging with you in the first place. Armed with this information, you can post with intention. 

  1. Think about who is engaging with you on each platform. Which people comment regularly, and how do you know them? Are they friends from your local civic league? Prior clients? Knowing who is engaging with you lets you know who is finding value in what you post.

  2. Identity what it is they’re engaging with. Which posts, specifically, have the most social media engagement from the people identified above? Use your Analytics and Insights to determine what content is getting engagement.

  3. Figure out the critical needs for the people identified in Number 1 and provided by the content identified in Number 2. Was it some random advice you gave? Perhaps it was a quote with business advice attached with it. Humor can even be valuable—who doesn’t enjoy engaging with a little crass or off-the-cuff humor?

  4. Go deeper: give more of what’s working. Expand on topics of interest to the skeleton community you already have. Provide alternative perspectives. Deep dive into subtopics related to that content. Find out the underlying theme behind that content that may be resonating with your audience and give more.

Here’s an example of how enhancing- not necessarily increasing social media engagement as our focus generates the conversions we want:

Okay, the scoop: 
On the BPC Content Instagram account (@blurbanplanner), we often post pictures taken while out on photography shoots for our real estate and luxury property clients. We especially do this if we feel a personal fondness or connection with the homes or properties. 

We posted content about ‘The Bestie’s House’, a house for sale by the Judy Boone Realty, Inc. firm. We dubbed this house ‘The Bestie’s House’ because we could picture ourselves enjoying a Taco Tuesday evening with our best friend...or moving in with our best friend entirely. Constructed in duplex fashion, the house is perfect for those seeking to live with someone but not with someone, if that makes sense. 

Here’s a picture of that house:

The ‘Bestie’s House’, one of our favorites. We were out on a shoot for the Judy Boone Realty, Inc firm.

The ‘Bestie’s House’, one of our favorites. We were out on a shoot for the Judy Boone Realty, Inc firm.

So we crafted content related to our experience while at the house on the shoot. One of the comments we engaged with that came as a result of the content we created designed for engagement was from someone interested in acquiring the property.

See for yourself here:

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This was the content we created for the property in question. Here is the audience engagement referenced above:

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Because of the content we developed that was designed to promote engagement, we were able to get just that...effective engagement from our target audience who is now primed and ready to follow up on our CTA (Call to Action). 

Often, we say we want to get more engagement on social media but we do nothing to encourage it. There are simple things we can do to get more engagement on social media. Here’s how you can increase your engagement, right now:

  • When people comment, actually respond. Even if you’re getting spam comments from strangers, still at least acknowledge all comments and reply. 

  • Engage with others’ posts by commenting on their content.

  • Think of comments as brief conversations and not some sort of video game tokens to be collected. More doesn’t equate to more effective.

  • Ask open-ended questions that encourage a response.

  • End your posts with questions to promote comment discussions.

  • Follow up each comment with an insightful, deep comment requesting more information from the commenter.

Think less about increasing engagement on social media and think more about how to enhance the engagement you do get. Remember: the goal is to foster relationships, not fight algorithms.